I was going through Adobe Bridge the other day and noticed some hidden gems in my vast collection of HDR images.  It is very easy to lose site of your work when shooting for HDR, sometimes gems get lost among the brackets and tone mapped save file chaos!  The perfect example is my wife and I’s honeymoon.  We were supposed to go to Scotland but that damn volcano erupted so we had to come up with another option.

We packed up the car and drove North on Highway One from San Francisco to Seattle, it was incredible!  In a way I am kind of glad that volcano erupted as we were able to see sites in America that we never would have seen otherwise, and yes we stopped at every gaudy kitsch tourist trap on the  West Coast.  There was the World’s Largest Sea Lion Cave, The Paul Bunyon Rest Stop, the Prehistoric Garden, and many more!

   

I took so many darn pictures, well into the thousands.  Thus we come back to the beginning of my story, I had lost many of these in the blunder of HDR tone mapping and bracket chaos.  I have a pretty darn good method of keeping track of my images, however, I lost site of all of these gems you are seeing in this post.  Thank goodness for Bridge and my new found way of finding all of my favorites!  I will be doing a tutorial this Friday on Adobe Bridge.

  

Photo Tip For The Week:

Go through your old folders from two years ago or so.  See what your work looked like back then.  Take those same pieces, pull them into your favorite Photo Editing software and apply your current workflow to them.  You will be pleasantly surprised to find out, those old photos will get a new revitalized face lift!  I know mine did.  I thought my old workflow was the bees knees back then, turns out they weren’t.  I cannot wait to see what my workflow will be like 2 years from now.

Blake Rudis
f.64 Academy and f.64 Elite are the brainchildren of Blake Rudis. While he is a landscape photographer he is most passionate about post-processing images in Photoshop and mentoring others.

For Blake, it is less about the art and more about the process. He dives deep into difficult topics and makes them easy to understand through his outside the box thinking.
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