Quick Sky Replacement Tips that Will Have Your Head Spin

Sky Replacements are necessary for landscape photography.  If you have an ethical problem with replacing skies, listen to this.   I can tell you that in the last year I have been to some fantastic National Parks, and I spent a LOT of money getting to them.

My hope with every visit to the National Parks was that I would have fantastic sunrise and sunsets and perfect blue sky puffy cloud days for my IR images.   As it turns out, like it always does, no amount of prayers, wishes, or bargaining with a genie made those skies the way I wanted them.   However, I did not let that ruin my landscape photos I was taking.

I am an artist, and I know that in art all things fly 🙂  Beyond that, if I stayed in those parks long enough I am sure I’d get the clouds I wanted.  So what is so wrong with a sky replacement if it is done correctly?

I had a similar situation last year at Kerry Park in Seattle.  I was photographing the skyline and had gorgeous magenta evening light.  The problem, the clouds were about 20 miles to the right of the city.   I looked like a fool among the crowd trying to wave them behind the skyline, but to my demise, it didn’t work.

In today’s tutorial, I am going to show you some fantastic Sky Replacement tips that will have your drab, dull, ugly landscape skies looking magnificent in minutes.  

While I do go pretty fast in this tutorial,  I would like you to know that I have an excellent course that is fresh off the press on f.64 Elite.   It is $29 for nonmembers and f64 Elite members stream it free with a paid subscription.   For $29 bucks you cannot beat what I have produced here!

Check out the Sky Replacement Course

✔ Ten video lessons
✔ 115 minutes of education
✔ all follow along pdf’s and images
✔ 21 High-Resolution Sky Dropins
✔ 52 Cloud Brush Presets

Blake Rudis
f.64 Academy and f.64 Elite are the brainchildren of Blake Rudis. While he is a landscape photographer he is most passionate about post-processing images in Photoshop and mentoring others.

For Blake, it is less about the art and more about the process. He dives deep into difficult topics and makes them easy to understand through his outside the box thinking.
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